Lafayette woman named 2020 Dole Caregiver Fellow to advocate for wounded veterans

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WASHINGTON, D.C. (KLFY) — The Elizabeth Dole Foundation announced Katie Guidry of Lafayette will join its 2020 class of Dole Caregiver Fellows – 30 military and veteran caregivers who have been carefully selected from across the country to represent those Americans caring for a wounded, ill, or injured service member or veteran at home.

Guidry serves as a caregiver for her husband, Barry, who sustained spinal injury that resulted in quadriplegia, paralysis of all four limbs as a result of his military service.

As a Dole Caregiver Fellow, Guidry will serve as a leader, community organizer, and advocate for the nation’s 5.5 million military caregivers – the spouses, parents, family members, and friends who provide more than $14 billion in voluntary care annually to someone who served. Guidry will join the 225 past and present Fellows who are trained by the Foundation and empowered to share their stories and perspectives directly with national leaders in the White House, Congress, U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs, and other government agencies, as well as decision makers in the business, entertainment, faith, and nonprofit sectors.

Guidry’s story, as provided by the Elizabeth Dole Foundation is below:

Katie Ferguson Guidry was nearing the top of her game when she met her now-husband Barry.  She was an experienced public relations executive and volunteered in her Lafayette, Louisiana community in every civic and nonprofit organization she could find. For almost 25 years, Barry had served as an infantry and special operations commander in the Army/Army National Guard and rose to the rank of Major. In 2010 he signed his retirement paperwork with a month and a half leave before his retirement would be official. On his first day of vacation, Barry injured himself in the Ouiska Chitto River, suffering a spinal injury that resulted in quadriplegia, paralysis of all four limbs. Barry and Katie had dated six months prior, and married a year and a half later.

For almost two years, Katie continued to work but eventually left to become Barry’s full-time caregiver. For two career-oriented people, this was a hard change. For Katie, it was challenging to transition from being a high-powered professional to being defined as Barry’s wife. Still, it helped them realize what was truly important in life: their relationship. Every day Barry achieves something new is one of Katie’s best days.

Katie’s responsibilities have changed over the years. In the beginning, there was little Barry could do himself. Over the months and years of therapy, Barry gradually improved to what is considered a functioning quadriplegic and has regained much use of his arms and some of his hands; he can even drive himself to therapy. Today, the care Katie provides has evolved but is still a full-time, hands-on role. She is Barry’s medical advocate, appeals coordinator, diagnostician, psychologist, nutritionist, physical and occupational therapist, housekeeper, entertainer, certified nursing assistant, chauffeur, errand runner and more.

Katie understands many military caregivers are unaware of the assistance available to them and wants to help caregivers utilize these life-changing resources. Katie believes Louisiana has fewer resources than other states and wants to change that, too. Her charitable and philanthropic spirit did not dissipate when she gave up most of her volunteer work; she is just channeling it toward caregivers’ needs.

Copyright 2020 Nexstar Broadcasting, Inc. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten, or redistributed.

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